July 20, 2018

Medicare Program – General Information

Medicare is a health insurance program for:

  • people age 65 or older,
  • people under age 65 with certain disabilities, and
  • people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant).

Medicare has:

Part A Hospital Insurance – Most people don’t pay a premium for Part A because they or a spouse already paid for it through their payroll taxes while working. Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) helps cover inpatient care in hospitals, including critical access hospitals, and skilled nursing facilities (not custodial or long-term care). It also helps cover hospice care and some home health care. Beneficiaries must meet certain conditions to get these benefits.

Part B Medical Insurance
– Most people pay a monthly premium for Part B. Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) helps cover doctors’ services and outpatient care. It also covers some other medical services that Part A doesn’t cover, such as some of the services of physical and occupational therapists, and some home health care. Part B helps pay for these covered services and supplies when they are medically necessary.

Prescription Drug Coverage – Most people will pay a monthly premium for this coverage. Starting January 1, 2006, new Medicare prescription drug coverage will be available to everyone with Medicare. Everyone with Medicare can get this coverage that may help lower prescription drug costs and help protect against higher costs in the future. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage is insurance. Private companies provide the coverage. Beneficiaries choose the drug plan and pay a monthly premium. Like other insurance, if a beneficiary decides not to enroll in a drug plan when they are first eligible, they may pay a penalty if they choose to join later.

SOURCE: https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-General-Information/MedicareGenInfo/index.html

3 Important Points About the Connecticut Foreclosure Mediation Program

 

1. What is the Foreclosure Mediation Program?
The Foreclosure Mediation Program was created in 2008 in response to the record number of foreclosure cases filed in our courts. In foreclosure mediation, a neutral third party (mediator) helps the homeowner and bank try to reach a fair, voluntary, and negotiated agreement. During mediation, the homeowner will meet with a mediator and a representative of the bank to try to reach an agreement.

2. Who are the mediators?
Foreclosure mediation specialists are Judicial Branch employees who are trained in mediation and foreclosure law. They have knowledge of different community-based resources and mortgage assistance programs that may be able to help homeowners. Most of the mediators are lawyers with many years of mediation experience. Mediators do not represent either party and cannot give legal advice.

3. How do I know if I am eligible for foreclosure mediation?
You are eligible if (a) you are the borrower (the person who signed the note secured by a mortgage on the property), (b) you are an owner-occupant of the property, (c) the property is your primary residence, (d) the property is a 1, 2, 3 or 4 family residence in Connecticut, and (e) your case is a mortgage foreclosure with a return date on or after July 1, 2008. Certain religious organizations may also be eligible for the program.

Homeowners who do not meet these requirements could be referred to the Foreclosure Mediation Program by a judge.  If you find yourself in foreclosure, you may want to contact an experienced Foreclosure Attorney like me to assist you in the process.

Source: Connecticut Judicial Branch Website

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