October 21, 2019

Interim Bankruptcy Rules Published for Public Comment

On February 19, 2020, the Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019, P.L. 116-54 (SBRA) will go into effect – long before the normal three-year rules amendment process runs its course. As a temporary measure, the Advisory Committee on Bankruptcy Rules has drafted interim bankruptcy rules and amendments to the official bankruptcy forms to address the new law that are now available for public comment through Nov. 13, 2019.

The proposed amendments and instructions on how to submit comments are posted on uscourts.gov.

When an advisory committee recommends an amendment to its rules or forms, it must obtain the approval of the Judicial Conference Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure to publish the proposed amendment for public comment. During the comment period, the public is encouraged to submit written comments and may also request to testify at public hearings on the proposed amendment.

There are two rules packages out for review.

August 19 Package

On June 25, 2019, the Judicial Conference Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure (Standing Committee) approved publication of proposed amendments to the following:

  • Appellate Rules 3, 6, 42, and Forms 1 and 2;
  • Bankruptcy Rules 2005, 3007, 7007.1, and 9036; and
  • Civil Rule 7.1.

The comment period is open from August 19, 2019 to February 19, 2020. Read the text of the proposed amendments and supporting materials:

Preliminary Draft of Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Appellate, Bankruptcy, and Civil Procedure (pdf)

Public Hearings on the August 19 Package

Members of the public who wish to present testimony may appear at public hearings on the proposed amendments.

How to Submit or Review Comments on the Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules & Forms (August 19 Package)

Written comments are welcome on each proposed amendment. The advisory committees will review all timely comments, which are made part of the official record and are available to the public. The comment period closes on February 19, 2020.

Comments and supporting files must be submitted electronically using the regulations.gov portal. After choosing the appropriate link below, click the “Submit a Comment” link. This will display the comment on the web form. You can then enter your submitter information and attach your comment as a file (up to 10MB), or type your comment directly on the web form. When you have finished attaching or typing your comment, click the “Preview Comment” link to review. Once you are satisfied with your comment, click the “Submit” button to send your comment to the relevant advisory committee. Upon completion, you will receive a tracking number for your submission.

Detailed instructions on how to submit a comment are given in the Regulations.gov FAQs.

October 16 Package

On February 19, 2020, the Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019, P.L. 116-54 (SBRA) will go into effect – long before the normal three-year rules amendment process runs its course. As a temporary measure, the Advisory Committee on Bankruptcy Rules has drafted Interim Bankruptcy Rules that can be adopted by courts as local rules or by general order when the SBRA goes into effect. The Advisory Committee has also drafted amendments to the Official forms to address the SBRA. The Standing Committee now seeks comment on the proposed SBRA rules and forms for a short four-week period prior to making final recommendations.

  • Interim Bankruptcy Rules 1007(b), 1007(h), 1020, 2009, 2012(a), 2015, 3010(b), 3011, and 3016.
  • Official Forms 101, 201, 309E, 309F, 314, 315, 425A, and new Official Forms 309E2, and 309F2

The comment period is open from October 16, 2019 to November 13, 2019. Because of the short publication period for the Interim Rules and related Official Forms, there will be no public hearings.

Read the text of the proposed amendments and supporting materials:

Preliminary Draft of Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure – Interim Bankruptcy Rules and Official Forms (pdf)

How to Submit or Review Comments on the Interim Bankruptcy Rules & Forms (October 16 Package)

Written comments are welcome on each proposed amendment. The Advisory Committee on Bankruptcy Rules will review all timely comments, which are made part of the official record and are available to the public. The comment period closes on November 13, 2019.

Comments and supporting files must be submitted electronically using the regulations.gov portal. After choosing the appropriate link below, click the “Submit a Comment” link. This will display the comment on the web form. You can then enter your submitter information and attach your comment as a file (up to 10MB), or type your comment directly on the web form. When you have finished attaching or typing your comment, click the “Preview Comment” link to review. Once you are satisfied with your comment, click the “Submit” button to send your comment to the relevant advisory committee. Upon completion, you will receive a tracking number for your submission.

Detailed instructions on how to submit a comment are given in the Regulations.gov FAQs.

SOURCE

History of Labor Day

Labor Day 2019

On September 2, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor celebrates and honors the greatest worker in the world – the American worker. Labor Day 2019 is the 125th anniversary of Labor Day being celebrated as a national holiday.

Labor Day: What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During 1887, four more states – Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York – created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Founder of Labor Day

More than a century after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.

A Nationwide Holiday

Women's Auxiliary Typographical Union

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The character of the Labor Day celebration has changed in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics, and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pays tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership – the American worker.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Labor

We are always here for you. Even on holidays. Contact us any time 24/7/365: CONTACT

FAQs About Reverse Mortgages

If you are over the age of 62 and planning on staying in your own home, a Reverse Mortgage may be for you, and you will want to read this eNewsletter very carefully because recently the Reverse Mortgage Laws have changed. Due to those changes, I sat down with an experienced Reverse Mortgage Consultant to get the latest and most important information for my clients.

Here are the highlights from our conversation:

Q: What is a Reverse Mortgage?

A: A Reverse Mortgage is a home loan that provides cash payments based on home equity; homeowners normally defer the payment of the loan until they pass away, sell or move out of the home.

Q: What are the big changes?

A: The government-insured reverse mortgage program is changing, with the introduction of a few new rules and more protection for borrowers. The changes are designed to create and even safer product or borrowers than has ever been available before. There are still plenty of product options that will allow you to access the equity in your home, while you continue to live there, with no monthly mortgage payments.

Q: What are the Payment options available?

A: With a reverse mortgage, you can still choose between a fixed-rate loan or an adjustable-rate loan. And you can receive the funds in a number of ways: as a lump sum, monthly advances, line of credit, or a combination of these options. There are new limits to the amount of money that can be taken out at the time of the loan closing and within the first 12 months of the loan, which will depend on each individual’s situation. Please contact a Reverse Mortgage Consultant to learn more as to how the restrictions may apply.

Q: How can the funds be used?

A: Reverse Mortgage funds can still be used however you see fit. In order to qualify, you must own your home outright, or have enough home equity that you can pay off your remaining mortgage balance with the loan proceeds. The Reverse Mortgage still allows you to eliminate monthly mortgage payments while remaining in your home. For example, some borrowers choose the line of credit option, keeping it available for any unexpected costs they might have in the future, such as medical expenses or in-home care. The credit line can also be used as a “standby” cash reserve that can be borrowed from when investments are underperforming. Others opt for a lump sum to pay their existing mortgage or other debts, to improve cash flow. Monthly advances can be used to supplement existing income, providing a steady stream of funds for a specified period or as long as you live in your home.

Q: What are the qualifications?

A: Currently, there are minimal credit or income requirements to qualify for a reverse mortgage.  However, there will be additional changes to the program, including a financial assessment of all applicants’ credit history, existing debt and income sources. These changes will impact some borrowers’ ability to qualify, so we encourage you to speak with us soon- before the changes go into effect. Your Reverse Mortgage Consultant can help determine whether you will qualify for a reverse mortgage, how much you can borrow, the costs involved and how the forthcoming financial assessment may affect your ability to qualify or how much you may receive.

If this information does not pertain to you, I am sure you know someone that it will help, like your parents or your friends. Please pass it along.

Does it make sense to save my home?

Whenever someone comes to see me about issues with their mortgage, the first question I ask is always: “Do you want to keep your home?”  And I always expect a very long answer because there are a lot of considerations when making that decision.  Factors include but are not limited to:

  • Can I really afford it?
  • Is it underwater?
  • Does it need a lot of work?
  • Will this disrupt my family?

Depending on the whole answer, sometimes it simply does not make sense to keep your home.

Does it make sense to save your home? | Consumer Legal Services, LLC

If you come to the conclusion that it is best for you to let your home go, you then have many options, such as:

  • Sale or Short-Sale
  • Bankruptcy
  • Deed in Lieu

Making this decision is hard and you should have as much information as you can get before coming to your final answer.  You should also have a solid exit strategy, should you decide it does not make sense to save your home.

We offer free and confidential consultations, and can help you decide if saving your home makes sense for you, and help you put together a plan for your next steps in whatever direction you choose.

If you choose to let your home go, we can help you exit gracefully.  Contact us to schedule an appointment to discuss your options. Attorney Theresa Rose DeGray can we reached directly at 203-713-8877.

Bankruptcy and Retirement

Here you are in your golden years and you’re also in overwhelming debt.  The question now becomes “what should you do?” If you have retirement savings, you can use that to pay down debt, but then you won’t have anything left to live on.  Or, a smarter choice, would be to keep your retirement savings, protect your pension(s) and/or retirement account(s), and declare Bankruptcy.  This is also a very wise decision if you do not have retirement savings or pensions and you are counting on social security benefits only to support yourself and your family.

Some people are under the misconception that when they reach retirement age, they become what is known as “judgment proof.”  On one hand this is correct and on another hand it is false.  Creditors can still sue you for delinquent accounts and secure judgments against you even if you are over 62 and/or retired.  If you are sued and lose, and then you fail to pay the court-ordered judgment amounts then the creditors can serve you with executions of the judgment and they can sweep your bank accounts.  You will then have the right to request the court to “exempt” the funds if they were derived from social security, pension or retirement funds, and eventually have the funds returned to your account.  Creditors cannot get attachments on your benefits from social security, pension or retirement accounts, but they can put liens on your property.  Therefore, you are not fully protected or “judgment proof” just because you are retired and no longer have “wages.”

The alternative to this dilemma is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.  If you are living on pension funds and/or social security benefits, you will likely qualify easily for Bankruptcy, and your social security benefits, pensions and retirement accounts will be totally exempt in the Bankruptcy process.  Ultimately, Bankruptcy will give you a “discharge” of your debts and you will be relieved of your obligation to pay your creditors.

Bankruptcy can also help you with delinquent or unpaid utilities, and foreclosures, as well.

Filing Bankruptcy in your golden years can help you wipe the slate clean so you can enjoy your retirement and have peace of mind.

Please contact Attorney Theresa Rose DeGray for more detailed information and a free consultation to discuss your specific situation at 203-713-8877.

Got Mold? (A Guest Post by Elizabeth Cote from Schaefer Inspection)

Perhaps mold is a concern because you are purchasing a home and your inspection is soon, or maybe you suspect the presence of mold in your current home. Mold spores are present everywhere we live and breathe.  Mold spores enter our homes through open windows, our shoes from outside, or items we bring inside. It is likely that most homes will test positive for mold spores in the air. The real concern should be mold that is growing in homes due to moisture that is not well-controlled. Should you test for mold? Consider your reason to test. Are there health, allergy, or respiratory issues that are creating concern? Some people will react to mold in their environment and others will not. The Connecticut Department of Public Health does not strongly recommend testing the air or contaminated surfaces to find out how much or what kind of mold is present. All reliable sources recommend cleaning and removal, after stemming the source of moisture. There are inconclusive findings from air testing in most home and work place environments:

  • Mold is everywhere– if you test the air, you will find some mold.
  • There are no standards for “acceptable levels” of mold in indoor environments, because different types of mold vary in ability to produce allergy or illness, and, people vary in individual susceptibility/resistance.
  • There is poor correlation between airborne concentrations of mold and health outcomes.
  • Knowing air test results will not change the abatement outcome – controlling moisture and removal of the moldy source is still the recommended course of action.

The most important tests are the eyeball and nose tests – can you see or smell mold or mildew, and/or, do you see evidence of water damage? If you can see or smell fungal growth, the next step is to identify the source and then remove it, using appropriate methods. If you smell a musty odor but cannot see visible growth, mold may be hidden behind wallpaper, paint, inside of wall cavities, etc. If necessary contact a local professional to discuss and price abatement. It is always important to get several opinions and prices. Schaefer Inspection Service has a list of mold abatement contacts and we can help connect you with a specialist.

The good news is you can take some simple and easy steps to prevent mold in your home. These include:

  • When water leaks occur, act quickly!
  • Remove wet carpet or furniture that cannot be dried within 24 – 48 hours.
  • Do not install carpet in areas of water usage such as bathrooms, kitchens, and basements.
  • If you see condensation or moisture collecting on windows, walls or pipes, act fast to dry the wet surface and reduce the moisture or water source.
  • Use air conditioners or dehumidifiers to keep humidity low.
  • Use a bathroom exhaust fan or open a window when showering.
  • Dry shower walls after use.
  • When cooking or using the dishwasher, use an exhaust fan or open the window.
  • Keep furniture and rugs from blocking air returns and vents.
  • Clean and repair gutters regularly to ensure good drainage.
  • Keep the crawlspace and basement well ventilated.
  • Ensure that your attic is properly ventilated and insulated.

Below you will find links to the Connecticut Department of Public Health website for more information about mold, mold assessment, and abatement. Schaefer Inspection Service can connect you with a mold abatement specialist in Connecticut. Call our office for more information: 800-345-2776.

https://portal.ct.gov/search-results/?q=mold#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=mold&gsc.page=1

https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Departments-and-Agencies/DPH/dph/environmental_health/eoha/pdf/MoldGuidanceInsurancepdf.pdf?la=en

This guest post is brought to you by Elizabeth Cote from Schaefer Inspection Service, Inc.  Contact Ms. Cote directly by email at ecote@schaeferinspectionct.com or by phone at 203-387-2131 for all your inspection needs!

800-345-2776

Tax Amnesty

A Guest Blog by Joshua M. Dickinson, CPA

Now is the perfect time to come clean and catch-up on your outstanding tax obligations. Connecticut has introduced “CT Fresh Start” which is a Connecticut tax amnesty program which runs through November 30, 2018. Almost all tax types are eligible under the program including both business and individual income taxes, payroll withholding taxes, business entity taxes, gift taxes, and sales & use taxes. A taxpayer is eligible if they failed to file a return, or failed to report the full amount of tax on a previously filed return, for any return due on or before December 31, 2016. The program is generally not available for taxpayers who have already received a bill for unpaid taxes or are currently under audit by the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services. The benefits include no assessed penalties on the outstanding obligation as well as interest at 50% of the normal rate. The program also allows for a limited look-back period for eligible non-filers of only three years and no criminal prosecution. Connecticut has not offered a tax amnesty program in quite a few years and the window to apply under the program is relatively short, so don’t miss out! To see if you can take advantage, please contact Joshua M. Dickinson, CPA of Walsh & Dickinson at 203-447-0550 immediately.

Special thanks to my colleague, Joshua M. Dickinson, CPA (pictured here on the right with me and Attorney Karen Zarkades on the left), for submitting this article to my newsletter and blog. He is a partner at Walsh & Dickinson, a full-service CPA firm operating out of Shelton, Connecticut, specializes in the needs of small to medium size privately held business and individual clients. Josh has over 22 years of diverse experience helping clients located throughout Connecticut. Please contact Josh at Walsh & Dickinson at 203-447-0550 or www.cpaswd.com. Thank you.

Frequently Asked Connecticut Bankruptcy Law Questions

Attorney Theresa Rose DeGray

Q: What is bankruptcy?

A: Bankruptcy is a legal process for people who cannot afford to pay their bills, and offers them a fresh start. The right to file for bankruptcy is granted by federal law, and all Connecticut bankruptcy cases are handled in federal courts located in New Haven, Bridgeport and Hartford.

Q: How can Bankruptcy help me?

A: Bankruptcy can eliminate unsecured debt, end collection harassment, stop foreclosures, prevent repossessions, stop wage garnishments and bank executions, and/or restore utility service.

Q: How often can I file bankruptcy?
A: You can file for a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy every eight (8) years. Chapter 13 Bankruptcies can be filed every six (6) years.

Q: What is the difference between a consumer bankruptcy and a corporate bankruptcy?

A: A consumer bankruptcy is for individuals or married couples that have personal, and not business, debt. A corporate bankruptcy is for a corporation, or non-human entity.

Q: What is the difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13?

A: A Chapter 7 results in a total discharge of most unsecured debt. A Chapter 13 is a repayment plan. Please see our Laws Page for an extended discussion on this topic.

Q: What does it cost to file for Bankruptcy?
A: We charge a fee for our services which will be quoted at our initial consultation. In addition to our fee for services, the bankruptcy court also charges filing fees.

Q: How can I pay for my Bankruptcy?

A: We offer affordable payment plans and accept all forms of payment, including cash, check, and debit cards from the person filing for bankruptcy. If a non-filer wishes to pay for our fees for their family member or friend, we will accept a credit card from that person. We honor MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express.

Q: What property can I keep?

A: You may keep all “exempt” property like your home, car, wedding rings, home furnishings, etc. All property that is not exempt is subject to liquidation and the resulting monies used to pay back your creditors. Do Not Be Alarmed: we strive to maximize your exemptions and protect all of your property.

Q: Will bankruptcy wipe out all my debts?

A: Yes, both Chapter 7 and 13 are designed to give you a fresh start with a clean slate.

Q: What is a discharge?

A: A discharge is a court order that says you do not have to repay your debts, but there are some exceptions, such as child support.

Q: Will I have to go to court?
A: Yes, in a Chapter 7 case, you will have to attend a proceeding once which is like a “court hearing,” although, it is very informal and presided over by a trustee and not a judge. A Chapter 13 case may require more than one court appearance, usually two or three.

Q: Will bankruptcy affect my credit?

A: Yes, but there are easy ways to rebuild your credit in a relatively short period of time following your final discharge.

Q: Will I be able to keep any credit cards?

A: No, you will have to fully disclose all of your debts and accounts, which will be closed and discharged. Bankruptcy is an all or nothing process. Full disclosure of your assets and liabilities is required and subject to penalties of perjury.

Q: Can I keep and use my debit card?

A: Yes, a debit card is not a credit card.

Q: Can I get a credit card after bankruptcy?

A: Yes, and you will be counseled on how and when to apply, and which type of card works best to rehabilitate your credit.

Q: Are utility services affected?
A: Current services will not be affected if the account is current or near current. Requests for new services after a bankruptcy may result in the utility company requiring a deposit.

Q: Can I be discriminated against for filing bankruptcy?

A: Absolutely not. Filing bankruptcy is a right given and protected by Federal Law.

Q: I am married, can I file by myself?

A: Yes, you may file as a married individual.

Q: If I am married and I file individually, will my spouse’s credit be affected?
A: No, your spouse’s credit will not be affected if he or she does not file.

Q: Can filing bankruptcy stop bill collectors from calling?
A: Yes, they will be prohibited from harassing you.

Q: Can I discharge my student loans by filing bankruptcy?

A: Generally student loans are not dischargeable in bankruptcy. There are a few exceptions to this general rule.

This firm is a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief amongst other things, under the Bankruptcy Code.

Mindful Money Management: 3 Strategies for Financial Success | By Caroline Wetzel, CFP®, AWMA®

How do you feel when you think about your financial situation? If you experience anxiety, uncertainty, or other unpleasant symptoms, you are not alone. Finances are a significant concern for many people. A 2017 study by Guardian Life Insurance Company of America entitled “Mind, Body, and Wallet,” found that money is cited as the #1 source of stress for a majority of American workers. The same survey showed that worry about personal finances is the leading cause of emotional stress and contributes to lower physical wellness.

But managing your money does not have to be an upsetting experience that negatively impacts you. Applying mindfulness techniques to your finances can help you cultivate a deeper awareness of your total financial picture, enabling you to approach your financial decisions with greater conviction and calculated risk.

What is Mindfulness?
Mindfulness is an intentional focus on the present moment. It has evolved over time to become a secular, psychological practice of developing and sustaining attention to thoughts, feelings, body sensations, and environmental stimuli that impact our experience of “now”.

Non-judgmental awareness of each moment is cultivated through mindfulness. Practitioners challenge themselves to attain a heightened sensitivity to the present through a variety of techniques including, but not limited to, meditation, pauses, and gentle movements. The impact of mindfulness on physical, mental, and social well-being is documented widely through scientific and academic studies.

Strategy 1: Create Space
Mindfulness promotes a consistent, ongoing process of using our senses to become more attuned to what is going on inside our bodies and outside us in our surrounding environment. This disciplined activity of “creating space” on a regular basis enables practitioners to experience feelings of groundedness and centeredness in the midst of racing thoughts and life’s busyness.

Try incorporating this strategy of “creating space” to your approach to your finances. Do you think about your finances beyond just paying the next bill that’s due? Do you know what you save and spend and check your statements? Do you review your insurance policies and ensure they continue to make sense for your needs?

Consider dedicating time – it can be as brief as a few minutes, or as long as 30 minutes, as long as it’s recurring – to pay your bills and consider questions like this as part of understanding your total financial picture. Formally reserve this time in your calendar and don’t cancel the appointment.

In the same way you go to the gym on a regular basis to take care of your physical health or ensure that you get a certain number of hours of sleep for your mental health, “create space” in your lifestyle to take care of your financial health.

Strategy 2: Plan with a Purpose
Mindfulness emphasizes awareness and non-judgment. Through mindfulness, we discover that our thoughts are narratives that we create as a result of our own unique perceptions and life experiences. Repeated practice of mindfulness empowers us to let go of the constant chatter – especially the negative thoughts – that monopolize our focus, and just be.

Adopt this same open, curious awareness to your financial situation. Without worrying about how you’ll do it, ask yourself “What do I want to do with my money?” Reflect on this question repeatedly during the spaces that you have created in your schedule, and observe what bubbles up for you. If the same priorities emerge each time you reflect on this question, these could be the goals that form the foundation of your unique financial plan.

When you are able to articulate clearly without judgment what is important to you and what you want to do with your money you can formulate a purpose-filled financial plan comprised of actions and behaviors that you can implement to make your financial goals a reality.

Strategy 3: Invest with Intention
Mindfulness facilitates sustained focus. It enables practitioners to cultivate greater clarity and improve their capacity to tune out distractions. As a result, mindfulness facilitates the ability to make decisions.

Apply this objective, intentional focus to your investment strategy. Do you know what you have invested your money in? Do you know why you chose the investments you selected? Are your investments in line with your values, comfort level with risk, and do they consider your tax situation?

When you invest with intention, you know what you invest your money in and why. This disciplined approach provides comfort and structure when the financial markets – and life – inevitably surprise us.

When you apply techniques promoted through mindfulness to manage your money, you can obtain greater control over your finances, confidence with your financial goals, and comfort that you are taking steps to realize your financial dreams.

By Caroline Wetzel, CFP®, AWMA®

Disclosure:

Caroline Wetzel is a Certified Financial PlannerTM (CFP®) and Vice President, Private Wealth Advisor with Procyon Private Wealth Partners, LLC.  Procyon Private Wealth Partners, LLC and Procyon Institutional Partners, LLC (collectively “Procyon Partners”) are registered investment advisors with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). This article is provided for informational purposes only and for the intended recipient[s] only. This article is derived from numerous sources, which are believed to be reliable, but not audited by Procyon for accuracy. This article may also include opinions and forward-looking statements which may not come to pass. Information is at a point in time and subject to change. Procyon Partners does not provide tax or legal advice.

For more information:

Caroline Wetzel, CFP®, AWMA®

Vice President

Private Wealth Advisor

Procyon Private Wealth Partners, LLC

1 Corporate Drive. Suite 225  |  Shelton, CT  06484

M: (844) Procyon |  D: (475) 232-2713 |  F: (475) 232-2736

cwetzel@procyonpartners.net   |  www.procyonpartners.net   |  https://www.linkedin.com/in/caroline-wetzel/

Not an April Fools Joke: Means Test Numbers Going Up!

2Means Test Numbers April 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find out if you qualify for FREE:

Qualification for Bankruptcy is based solely on income. It is calculated using your last six months of income. The Means Test used to determine qualification allows you to make up to certain amounts of money based on your state and household size. We’re excited about the new Means Test Numbers (above) as they are going up, therefore allowing many more people to file for Bankruptcy relief.

Please click here to schedule your free consultation which includes a FREE Means Test.

This firm is a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief amongst other things, under the Bankruptcy Code.